Monday, August 10, 2009
 
An eight-year-old girl who survived the trauma of a liver transplant as a baby is heading for the 17th World Transplant Games in Australia.
Choi Sum-yi will join 42 other people from Hong Kong who have fully recovered from serious illness after organ transplants.
Sum-yi, who underwent the transplant just two months after she was born, will compete in five swimming events.
"I am good in freestyle," Choi said, adding she has been practicing hard for the competition since last year.
"I practice six days a week, and each session lasts at least an hour."
Sporting a warm smile, Sum-yi talked about her energetic nature, saying she seldom tires of swimming.
She is also passionate about the gu- zheng, calligraphy, weiqi and Chinese martial arts.
Nevertheless, her tight weekly schedule has not affected her academic performance - Sum-yi was ranked first among her Primary Two schoolmates.
Hong Kong Society of Transplantation president Philip Li Kam-tao said 112 organ failure patients had transplants from early this year to August 6.
"This shows we now have more organ donors and waiting time can be shortened," Li said, adding that not every organ failure patient is as lucky as Sum-yi.
"The demand for organ transplants is always increasing. We still have 1,700 on the waiting list," he said, adding it normally takes at least a four-year wait for a kidney transplant, and that many heart and lung failure patients die waiting.
"I hope the number of donors continues to increase, especially in Hong Kong which has comparatively fewer donors compared with other countries."
 
Serinah Ho

Monday, August 10, 2009

 
An eight-year-old girl who survived the trauma of a liver transplant as a baby is heading for the 17th World Transplant Games in Australia.
 
 
Choi Sum-yi will join 42 other people from Hong Kong who have fully recovered from serious illness after organ transplants.
 
 
Sum-yi, who underwent the transplant just two months after she was born, will compete in five swimming events.
 
 
"I am good in freestyle," Choi said, adding she has been practicing hard for the competition since last year.
 
 
"I practice six days a week, and each session lasts at least an hour."
 
 
Sporting a warm smile, Sum-yi talked about her energetic nature, saying she seldom tires of swimming.

閱讀全文:Transplant girl set for swim of her life in Oz

From: South China Morning Post
Ella Lee
Jul 23、2009
From: South China Morning Post
Ella Lee

Jul 23、2009

Haunted by memories of a friend who died from liver cancer、a 37-year-old man became the first person in Hong Kong to donate part of his liver to a total stranger.
 
The selfless act by Kenny Chan Kai-yiu saved the life of 19-year-old Tiffany Law Man-ting、who was critically ill after a previous transplant from her father had failed.
 
Mr Chan、a devout Christian、said he had decided to help Ms Law after learning of her plight though friends、and when he found that their blood types matched、"it was like a calling from God".
 
"I wanted to save her、and I thank my mother for supporting me," he said 10 months after the transplant、as Ms Law、now recovered、prepared to start a marketing course at Polytechnic University.
 
Ms Law said: "I thank him so much. My father risked his life to save me once、and I couldn't imagine that a stranger would do the same."

閱讀全文:A man's selfless act saves the life of a stranger